Duke-UNC Consortium Faculty Grants

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Faculty Small Grants Program – Academic Year 2020-2021

With support from the Title VI program of the U.S. Department of Education, the Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies (which includes the UNC Center for Middle East and Islamic Studies and the Duke University Middle East Studies Center) is pleased to offer the following grants:

Middle East Studies Course Development Grants – Modifying In Person Courses to Online/Hybrid Courses 

The Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies is pleased to offer several summer course development grants of up to $1,500 each to modify existing in-person courses in Middle East studies to online or hybrid courses. The award will be offered as a stipend/overload. Special preference will be given to language instructors and junior faculty at Duke, UNC-Chapel Hill, and Durham Tech.

Successful applicants will be required to share their modified course materials with the Consortium by the start of the Fall 2020 semester, so that the Consortium can assist other instructors in making the transition to online and hybrid teaching. Successful applicants will also be asked to discuss their work at an online meeting with other faculty this coming academic year. 

The deadline for applications is June 26, 2020.

Please submit the following:

1.      The current course syllabus to be modified

2.      A 1-2 page description of how you intend to modify the course to online or hybrid form

Both items must be included in one PDF document. 

Duke applicants: Please submit your proposals to Griffin Orlando at griffin.orlando@duke.edu 

UNC and Durham Tech applicants: Please submit your proposals to Shai Tamari at tamari@unc.edu 

Statement Against Racism and Omar Ibn Said Initiative 

The Center for Middle East and Islamic Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the Duke University Middle East Studies Center, the Duke Islamic Studies Center, and the Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies stand with theMiddle East Studies Association and other national scholarly organizations in deploring systemic racism and racial violence against African Americans and pledging to “stand in solidarity with all those who are trying to make a world of racial equality and justice.” 

 As part of their commitment to investigate and overcome racism in all its forms, the centers and consortium are launching the Omar Ibn Said Initiative to support events and instructional activities on racism as it relates to Middle East and Islamic studies. The initiative is named in honor of Omar Ibn Said, a Muslim scholar from West Africa who was enslaved in North Carolina. His Arabic writings are the subject of a faculty-student collaborative research project at Duke and UNC-Chapel Hill.

In addition to events on this subject that the centers and consortium are planning for the upcoming 2020-2021 academic year, the initiative includes a grant program of $10,000 for in-person or online events and instructional activities organized by faculty, students, and staff at Duke and UNC-Chapel Hill. There is no deadline for funding requests, which will be considered on a rolling basis. Colleagues at UNC-Chapel Hill who wish to participate in this initiative are encouraged to contact Shai Tamari <tamari@email.unc.edu>; colleagues at Duke who wish to participate are encouraged to contact Griffin Orlando <griffin.orlando@duke.edu>.